Taking Over – shine on bright Black Starlets

Shatta Wale’s Taking Over isn’t just the most wildly trending song on Ghanaian radio today; it’s also the ‘official’ party song for the Black Starlets, Ghana’s national U-17 team, as they’ve marched from victory to victory at the ongoing Nations Cup in Gabon.

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Indeed, the Starlets have exuded much promise and maturity since their first game at the tournament when they beat Cameroon — incidentally the very nation responsible for Ghana missing out on the last edition of the event — 4-0. They went one better in their next outing, thumping the sorry hosts and qualifying for the knockout stages — and the Fifa World Cup to be held later this year — with a game to spare. That third fixture, versus Guinea, ended in a goalless draw, but on parade was a different Ghana side, one that had nothing to play for. The stakes were considerably higher, though, when the Starlets took on Niger (a team they had comfortably beaten in a two-legged friendly just before the competition) in the semi-finals. Again, the goals failed to come, stretching the affair to a series of spotkicks where Ghana’s superiority gave them the edge in a 6-5 victory.

 

Ghana’s ability in front of goal may have waned somewhat in those two matches — a reason for which many Ghanaians tinged their initial optimism with caution — but at least they have been consistently impervious in defence. The Starlets are the only team thus far not to have conceded, and that’s a run head coach Paa Kwesi Fabin would love to extend and preserve in the final against Mali. The Malians themselves are something of a free-scoring side, having put past opponents just one goal less than Ghana’s nine. Like Ghana, too, Les Aiglonnets booked their ticket to the final via a penalty shootout, albeit one of the worse you’d ever see, with neighbours Guinea missing four of their spotkicks to ease the former’s passage.

And, oh, again like Ghana, who seek to become the first nation to win the trophy for keeps (a feat to be sealed by a third triumph in the competition), Mali aren’t without extra incentive, namely, the quest to become only the first team to successfully defend the title and simultaneously pull level with Ghana, Nigeria and Gambia on two conquests. Clearly, Mali — hosts of the first ever continental U17 championship’s back in 1995, the current holders of the trophy, and [losing] finalists at the last World Cup — would be no easy prey.

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All of that makes Mali the most formidable, most motivated team Ghana could face at the tournament. All of that, too, makes this the one game Ghana have little option but to win. Per the expectations of the many Ghanaians who have waited 18 years since the country last won the trophy — and 12 after their most recent appearance in the final, when a goal scored under controversial circumstances saw them overcome by Gambia — the Starlets are obliged, not just to triumph, but to do it in style and with character. It’s the only climax that the creative brilliance of Emmanuel Toku (touted as the brightest among the bunch), the goalscoring prowess of skipper Eric Ayiah (joint leading scorer at the showpiece), the remarkable confidence of Idriss ‘Tampico’ Mohammed (scorer of that peach of a panenka versus Niger), and the entire team’s collective brilliance deserves. Winning may not be the prime objective at under-age competitions — though that is a point not quite drummed home fully to folks this side of the Atlantic — but it’s a reward that wouldn’t be rejected.

Glory beckons, and there could be no better time for the Starlets to do just as Wale said in the song referred to at the outset — show Ghana, go harder, and take over.

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